UK's Green Investment Bank Lends £9.87m for LED Streetlight Upgrade

STIRLING Regional Council, Scotland, is borrowing £9.87m from the UK's Green Investment Bank (GIB) to install LEDs instead of traditional sodium lightbulbs in 12,000 streetlights over four years.

The local authority will also replace 4,000 of the columns (or lampposts), marking a major investment in infrastructure for the county. Stirling is expected to cut its streetlight power consumption by 63% and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by the equivalent of 14,400 tonnes over the lifetime of the project. The energy saved each year would be equivalent to the total electricity consumed by over 850 homes.

GIB launched its Green Loan for local councils to help them reduce their streetlight electricity bills by up to 80%. The Green Loan offers UK local authorities a low, fixed-rate financial arrangement over a period of up to 30 years. It has been specifically designed to finance public sector energy efficiency projects where repayments are less than the savings realised.

The UK currently spends about £300m a year powering its seven million streetlights, with fewer than one million lamps so far using low-energy LEDs.

Stirling is following in the footsteps of local authorities in Glasgow and Southend-on-Sea, making it the second council in Scotland and the third in the UK to take out a GIB Green Loan to replace its inefficient and costly old street lamps with modern, energy efficient models.

Picture of the centre of the City of Stirling by Donald MacDonald, reproduced under CCL. Source GIB.

Monday 18th July 2016


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